Icom IC-α6A

This is a curious radio from the 90s. It has 5 channels in the 50 MHz (6 meter) band.

The transmit power is 150 mW and uses Frequency Modulation (FM). Can be used in simplex or half-duplex mode. It also includes a VOX function. 

It's meant for short range communication (less than 1 km). A connector for an external speaker microphone is provided, and the user can also connect an external antenna.

The museum holds two totally functional units, with the original FA-50 antennas and manuals. Both units are used, so they have minor cosmetic wear.


General Electric Ranger

This is a radio from the 80s. The official model number is 3-5942B. It's very simple to use: only power ON and PTT controls are available.

It seems to be designed for outdoor activities, due it's ruggedness, simplicity and eye-catching colour.

It uses amplitude modulation (AM) and has one cystal-controlled channel (49.86 MHz). The operating range is very short.

The museum holds two units. One of them is fully operational and cosmetically good. The other one works, but has a crack on the case, belt clip is missing and the antenna is loose.


Maxon PC-50

This is a very nice radio from the 90s. It works in the 49 MHz USA license excempt band.

It was intended to be used in outdoor activities like camping, fishing, etc. It has five channels, the modulation is FM and the power is about 100-150 mW. The PTT can be operated manually or using VOX (with adjustable sensitivity). The squelch works very well and the audio quality is great. It's a good radio to use alongside the VHF military gear if 25 kHz steps are supported (one of the channels on the PC-50 is 25 kHz divisible).

The claimed range is 1/4 mile. The museum holds one unit, new in box with a boom mic headset and all the paperwork (guarantee card, manual, etc...).


Pace (Pathcom) Communicator I

This is an amateur radio from the 70's. It seems to be derived from a commercial model (Pace Landmaster series).

It accepts up to 6 channels (crystal controlled). It has an s-meter, battery indicator, squelch control and earphone jack. It also accepts an external microphone/speaker. Frequency modulation (FM). Official frequency range 144-148 MHz. It uses an UHF (PL) female connector.

The museum holds two units. None of them is properly working (TX or RX fails). In addition, someone converted them to operate on the commercial 170 MHz band. I'm unable to find the schematic or service manual anywhere. Any help is appreciated.


Standard C111 VHF FM transceiver

This is an amateur radio from the 90's. Made by Standard in Japan.

It's very easy to use, with very few controls: Frecuency selection by thumbweels and +5 kHz swith, HI/LO power switch, repeater offset, volume and squelch. It comes with a case for AA alkaline batteries. My vesion does not have the CTCSS board installed.

The museum holds one unit. Not in working condition. I'm unable to find the schematic or manuals anywhere. Any help is appreciated.



Yaesu FT-207R VHF FM transceiver

This is an amateur radio from the 70's. Made by Yaesu in Japan.

It was very advanced for the time: microprocessor control, scanner, memories, repeater offset,  full 144-148 MHz range, and a 2.5W power output. 

The museum holds one fully functional unit with wear and tear. Repaired and tuned by my friend Armando.


Yaesu FT-2003 VHF FM transceiver

This is a professoional radio from the 70's. Made by Yaesu in Japan.

It was a very sturdy and simple to use professional radio. It has 6 crystal controlled channels. The power output is 3W. The controls are very easy to use: channel, volume and squelch only. CTCSS can be fitted as an option. The frequency range was 146-174 MHz.

The museum holds one fully functional unit (with the original rubber duck antenna). Completely restored and realigned by my friend Armando.



Yaesu FT-203R VHF FM transceiver

This is an amateur radio from the 80's. Made by Yaesu in Japan.

It's basic, but practical. The frequency is set by means of thumbwheels and a + 5 kHz switch. It has an analog S-meter, tone burst function and VOX. It's frequency range is between 144 and 146 MHz and has a 2.5 W power output. 

The museum holds one unit, showing heavy wear. It transmits, but the PTT switch is faulty. The radio receives, but there is a fault in the received audio power amplifier. 



Icom IC- μ2E VHF FM transceiver

This is an amateur radio from the 80's. Made by Icom in Japan.

It's a pretty cute and compact radio (hence the "micro" name). Looks very advanced for that time: LCD, Digital frequency set, memories and digital S-Meter. It's frequency range is between 144 and 146 MHz and has a 1 W power output. 

The museum holds one unit, showing heavy wear. It has been modified for transmitting into the 150 MHz band. The radio receives, but the loudpeaker cables were cut by somebody. 



Icom IC- μ2AT VHF FM transceiver

This is the american version of the previous model. The main difference is the frequency coverage (144-148 MHz) and the DTMF keypad.

This particular unit has a CTCSS board installed and powes up, but the display is broken.



M-TECH HR-85 Marine VHF Transceiver

This is a marine VHF transceiver from the 90's, made by M-TECH in Japan.

Very advanced in fact: 5W full power, US and International channels, scan, reduced power level option for extend the battery life and direct channel entry. It's also equipped with a connector for an external power supply, if ypu don't want to use it directly from the battery.

The museum holds one unit, totally functional and with minor wear.



Icom IC-H6

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 80'S made by Icom in Japan.

Basic but very rugged. The output power is 1.5-2W and It's very easy to operate: only channel selection, squelch and volume.

The museum holds one unit, in good cosmetical shape. The particular model is the H6150E (H6, Europe, 150 MHz band).



Icom IC-2B4

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 80'S made by Icom in Japan.

Basic but very rugged. The output power is 1.5-2W and It's very easy to operate: only frequency selection (thumbwheels and 5 kHz switch), squelch and volume. It has also a power level switch in the back.

The museum holds one unit, not fully functional and with heavy wear and tear. It's a version of the mytical IC-2A/AT/N/E/etc. I'm also searching the IC-M2 (marine version).



Icom IC-2E

This is an Amateur Radio from the 80'S made by Icom in Japan.

Basic but very rugged. The output power is 1.5 W and It's very easy to operate: only frequency selection (thumbwheels and 5 kHz switch), squelch, offset,  and volume. It has also a power level switch in the back.

The museum holds one unit, showing heavy wear but fully functional. Tuned and serviced by my friend Armando.



Motorola GP-68 VHF

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 2000's made by Motorola

This is a very interesting radio: 146-174 MHz coverage, 20 channels, scan and fully front pannel programmable (FPP). You don't need the CPS for setting the freqs, the tones and the squelch. Very HAM friendly. 

The museum holds one unit, totally functional but with heavy wear and tear. The case is broken also.



Telecomsa Minifono EP.2000 VHF low

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 80's, made by the spanish company Telecom S.A.

It works in the 70 MHz (4 m) band. Frequency Modulation (FM). It has six crystal controlled channels, with no CTCSS. The controls are very similar to those on the Icom IC-H6: Volume, channel, squelch and a selector for the external speaker microphone. The battery packs are compatible with those from Icom from the same period.

The museum holds one unit, totally functional but with heavy wear and tear. Donated by my friend Armando.



Telecomsa Minifono EP.2000 VHF high

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 80's, made by the spanish company Telecom S.A.

It works in the 160 MHz (2 m) band. Frequency Modulation (FM). It has six crystal controlled channels, with no CTCSS. The controls are very similar to those on the Icom IC-H6: Volume, channel, squelch and a selector for the external speaker microphone. The battery packs are compatible with those from Icom from the same period.

The museum holds one unit, totally functional but with heavy wear and tear. Donated by my friend Armando. This particular unit comes with a leather holster and a remote speaker mic.



Icom IC-H16

This is a very well known radio from the 80s-90s. Made by Icom in Japan.

It's a Land Mobile Radio covering the 148-174 MHz band (FM mode). It can be used on the 2m amateur band (down to 144 MHz).

It has some advanced features that make it very HAM friendly: 16 channels, field programmable after removing a jumper, scan, CTCSS, manual carrier squelch adjustment, 3 or 5 W power depending on the battery pack and external power jack.

The museum holds one unit. Not functional.



Kenwood TH-205E

This is a very interesting radio from the 80s. Made by Kenwood.

It's an amateur handie covering the 144-146 MHz band (FM mode). It can be used also for receiving between 141 and 163 MHz. The rated output is 5W, also supporting a low power mode.

It has some advanced features like scan and three memories. CTCSS is not included but the board can be purchased as an option.

The museum holds one unit. It powers on but the keyboard is not working and the PTT switch is faulty.



Icom IC-H10

This is a professional radio manufactured by Icom in the 90s.

It covers from 150 to 174 MHz in FM mode. It has 10 channels. It is very small if you compare it to other professional radios from it's time. The power can be reduced to 1W using a recessed switch in the back plate.

The controls are very simple: channel switch, squelch level and volume level.

The museum holds only one unit. Not functional and with heavy wear and tear.



Standard / Telemobile C834L

This is a Land Mobile Radio from the 70'S made by Standard in Japan. It operates in the 146-174 MHz range with 6 crystal controlled channels.

Basic but very rugged and heavy. It's very easy to operate: only channel selection, squelch, power level and volume.

The museum holds one unit in perfect working order, with minor wear. I also have a leather holster and a fast charger. All the goods have been donated by my friend Armando.



Kenwood TH-21AT

This is a very nice micro transceiver from the 80's. Made by Kenwood in Japan.

Very cute and easy to use. It has no memories or CTCSS unit. The antenna connector is curious because is a kind of RCA connector with threads. There are two available power levels: 1W or 150 mW.

This radio 's style is very well known for the fans of the Die Hard movies, because it's the radio used by Bruce Willis and his antagonist. The radio in the movie was the TH-21BT (with tone board) and a shortened antenna (nor matching the VHF band).

The musem holds a radio with the original antenna and belt clip. The alkaline battery case was damaged by the previous owner due to battery leakage.  



Belcom HC-144/µP VHF transceiver

It was manufactured by Nihon Dengyo CO., LTD in Japan. I believe that it's from the 80s.

It's designed for the VHF amateur band. It has three power levels (100 mW/1 W/3.5 W). Very nice scanning options. Also an optional CTCSS board was available. 10 memories are available and an utility clock is also provided.

The museum holds only one unit, almost new. I also have the original leather holster. I don't have the original antenna or the accesories connector cover.



Standard HX220S marine VHF transceiver

It was manufactured by Standard in Japan. It's fairly recent (from the 90s, I believe). Has all the features expected in a modern marine transceiver except DSC (6W/1W power, international and USA channels, scanner, key lock, etc).

The museum holds one unit, almost new. The original battery pack still charges and it includes the original plastic holster and the original antenna. It was donated by my friend Armando.



Motorola GP-300

The legendary handie talkie from the 90's. Made by motorola.

It was one of the most durable and easy to use professional handie in the whole history. You can still see lots of them in operation today. 5W, 8 channels in the 146-174 MHz band. Easy moddable for adding up to 16 channels and the amateur 144-146 MHz band. This particular unit does not have the 5 tone signalling.

The museum holds one unit, with speaker mic, holster, battery charger and antenna. It has some wear due to the age but it's fully functional.



PYE Bantam E-9555

A very advanced public service portable radio from the mid sixties. It's truly portable, using AA alkalines or AA NiCd rechargeable cells. All solid state, allowing long operation times and very little maintenance. 

The controls are very simple, but the squelch operates in the reverse way (turning CW is loosening the squelch, while  turning CCW is tightening the squelch). It has three crystal controlled channels. This unit has only the channel one installed (82.5 MHz). The modulation is FM and the power output is less approx 1W.

The museum holds one unit, with a steel band and leather pouch. Fully adjusted and donated by my friend Armando. I don't have the telescoping whip antenna that seems to be common in most pictures of this radio. Our particular unit is thought to be used by the ICONA (the spanish government agency for the environment protection).



Standard C-112

It's a modern HAM VHF handheld from the 90s. Very sturdy and compact construction. It's simple to use, puts out around 5W power and has up to 20 memories for your favourite repeaters, call channels, etc. CTCSS is not built in (needs an option board).

The museum holds one unit, with some wear and tear. The battery pack is dead. Donated by Ignacio, EA4ADG. I have the schematics and the user manual, but service manual will be gratly appreciated.



Yaesu FT-23R

A true classic from the 90s. Full VHF HAM band coverage, general coverage, memories, 5W if powered with 12V battery pack, very rugged and easy operation.

The museum holds one unit, with minor wear and tear. Serviced by my friend Armando. There is also a FBA-10 clamshell for using AA primary cells. The CTCSS optional unit is not installed.