Westinghouse House and Yard Communicator

This is the Westinghouse House and Yard Communicator. The official model number is H960TC4. This handie was sold in pairs in the 60s and 70s. It was license-free in the USA because the RF power is below 100 mW. It has a non-removable long telescopic antenna.

It uses Amplitude Modulation (AM). The transmission frequency is crystal controlled (channel 11, 27.085 MHz) and the receiver is broadband.

Currently, the museum holds two units. One is refurbished and fully functional. The other one is still in its original state.


Great Electronics GW-766 (Mini Com)

This is the Great Electronics Corp Mini Com. The official model number is GW-766. This handie was sold in pairs in the 80s. It was license-free in the US because the RF power is below 100 mW. It has a non-removable short telescopic antenna. 

It's meant to be very simple and portable. Pocked sized and with only two controls: Power on and PTT.

It uses Amplitude Modulation (AM). The transmission frequency is crystal controlled (channel 14, 27.125 MHz) and the receiver is broadband.

Currently, the museum holds two units. Both are fully functional, showing the typical wear due to the use. One of them has the battery compartment lid broken.


Brigmton BW-3868

This is the Brigmton BW-3868. This handie was sold in pairs in the 90s. It has a non-removable long telescopic antenna. 

It's a very basic transceiver, but has some advanced features as the earphone jack and a battery test buton. Battery level is estimated with a LED indicator.

It uses Amplitude Modulation (AM). The transmission frequency is crystal controlled (channel 19, 27.185 MHz).

Currently, the museum holds three units. Two of them are fully functional, showing the typical wear due to the use. The third one has the battery compartment lid broken and the audio output was faulty due to a dry capacitor.


Mascot W-2105

This is the Mascot W-2105. This handie was sold in pairs in the 80s. It's a toy, more than a practical walkie talkie.

According to the original packaging, it's RF power is about 50 mW. The receiver is broadband. The transmitter is not crystal controlled. The frequency is tuned by means of an adjustable coil and it's very unstable. It uses Amplitude Modulation (AM).

The museum holds two units. One of them is refurbished, and the other one is in it's original condition.



Great Electronics GW-228

This is the Great GW-228. It seems from the 70s.
The transmit power is 100 mW and it has some higher tier features. 

The receiver is superheterodyne and has capacity up to 3 crystal controlled channels (6 crystals, 3 for TX and 3 for RX). Only the crystals for the channel 14 (27.125 MHz) are fitted from the factory. It also has a connector for an external earphone and a battery charger port. It uses AM modulation and has a long telescopic antenna.

The museum holds two units. One of them is fully functional. The other one has a problem on the RX stage.



Sony ICB-1000W

This is a very advanced Sony unit from the 70's. It has two crystal controlled channels (CH 7 and CH 11). A very long telescopic and foldable antenna is provided. The output power is 500 mW and has a S-Meter, battery level meter, modulation meter, volume and squelch controls.

It mimics the "military banana radio" style. It's aimed to outdoor use, because it's waterproof (noted by the All Weather designation).  The operator can use the inbuilt microphone and speaker or use the external jacks. Can be powered using 8 AA cells or an external power adapter.

The museum holds one fully functional unit, with minor wear and tear.



Sony ICB-170

This is a basic Sony unit from the 70's. It has only one channel (CH11).

It is a very basic design: Only three controls: PTT, power ON/OFF and volume adjustment. The power is very reduced: just 100 mW. It has the typical smart design from the old Sony's radios. It's powered by a 9V battery and can be used in all weather conditions.

The museum holds one fully functional unit, with minor wear and tear.



Digi-Tech Model 48186

This was my first two way radio. It's a toy from the 90's. Only one channel (27.145 MHz, not a regular CB channel). It uses amplitude modulation and the operating range is very short.

It's very simple to operate: only volume, PTT and this annoying "code button"

I have one of them. Fully functional, minor wear.



DNT HF-13/12

This is a german CB radio from the 70s. It's somewhat powerful for those times (2W). The user can select all the CB regular channels between 4 and 15. All the crystals are installed. The modulation is AM.

It's very simple to operate: only volume, PTT, squelch and channel.

I have one of them, donated by DH4PY. It has some wear and all the pots are scratchy. Otherwise it works well.



Elbex GT-418

This is a  CB radio from the 80s. It's powerful (5W) and has 6 crystal controlled channels. It's very "similar" to the models manufactured in Taiwan by GREAT Electronics Corp. AM modulation.

It provides some uncommon features for a HT, such as mic gain switch and HI/LO power switch.

I have one of them, donated by DH4PY. It has heavy wear and some electronic malfunctions.



Hitachi CH-1330R

This is a  Japanese CB radio from the 60s. Output power between 500 mW and 1W. Superb fit and finish.

Very simple operation: The Squelch and Volume controls are in the front pannel and the channel switch is on the back cover. Two channels (CH4 and CH9). AM modulation. It has a battery meter also.

I have one of them, donated by DH4PY. It is in very nice condition and working order.



Tokai Super Phone TC-130-G

This is a  Japanese CB radio from the 60s. Very nice finish. The output power is unknown.

Very simple operation: Only squelch and volume controls. An external microphone and headphone can be connected. Also an external antenna can be attached.

I have one of them, donated by DH4PY. It is in very nice condition and working order. Only one plastic cover for the potentiometer is deteriorated.



Team Shorty

This is a  german radio set from the mid 90's. It was meant to be sold as a toy, but I think that it was one of the the most advanced license-excempt band radios of that time in Spain. In those times the PMR446 standard was not available yet in our country and the regular 4W CB sets required paying a fee and registering any individual transceiver in your ECB type license.

The radios are rated for a 100 mW output. The range is very nice in open or semi urban rural areas. They have two CB channels (19 and 28) and the modulation is FM. They also have a call signal and squelch adjustment (just like a "real radio").

I have a pair of them, totally new, including original packing and instruction manual. The handies were donated by DH4PY. When I was a child I had two additional units but I dropped them into the dustbin when I was a college student because I needed space in my room. Now I regret dropping them, because the design of the potentiometer's knobs was somewhat different and nicer.



Fermax Transceiver 10 (F-83)

This is a  very basic spanish made transceiver from the mid 70s. The power output is 0.5W and has only a crystal controlled channel (CH 14). The modulation is AM. There are only two controls: Volume and PTT. It has three jack connectors in the bottom: charge, earphone and external antenna. The antenna is very long and efficient.

The museum holds only one unit, totally functional but with wear and tear. Complete with the original leather pouch.



Intek PRO-6HC

Those are very nice transceivers from the 90s. They have 6 channels programmable by means of a diode matrix. They can be programmed from 26 to 28 MHz. The modulation is FM and the output power is 4W. The controls are very similar to those on the Icom IC-H6.

The museum holds one unit, in almost new condition with the original boxing. I have the user manual and the instructions for programming the diode matrix. If you are interested, send me an email.



Alan RC-30

This is a cheap and basic transceiver from the 90s. It has 3 channels, crystal controlled and selected via a side switch. The power is 100 mW and the modulation is FM. It has volume and squalch controls.

The museum holds one unit, new in box. Totally functional.



Bosch Commander HCB 1

This is a transceiver from the mid 70s. AM modulation and up to three crystal controlled channels. It does not have squelch control. The maximum power output was 500 mW. Made in Japan for Bosch.

The museum holds one unit, with broken antenna sections and corroded battery compartment. Only one channel crystals installed.